Making your zapper zap through walls

You may know of our Printmakers media cabinet build. We love our cabinet. But there was one major design flaw (well not so much a flaw, more of a drawback). If we wanted to watch TV or control the volume on anything in the cabinet we needed to have at least one door open so that the remotes could reach the components.

I looked around for a solution and couldn't come up with much. Until one day I was listening to a podcast and off topic one host started talking about an IR repeater and how he put all his components in to a closet. DING!

I headed over to Amazon and promptly purchased the Cables To Go Impact Acoustics 40430 Infrared (IR) Remote Control Repeater Kit. Long name. Tiny thing. Great product.

An IR repeater takes the infrared signal from your remote and "blasts" it out out of little stick on modules. It's super simple to hook up and took no time at all to get working.

Step 1:
Position the IR receiver:

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I chose just under the center speaker. Even with our bluetooth remote out of habit we always point it at the TV. This can sometimes be a problem when your components are a foot below the tv. This takes all the guesswork out of changing channels.

Step 2:
Plug the IR receiver in to the base unit.

Step 3:
Plug your IR Blasters in to the base unit (while you're at it plug in the power cable too).

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Step 4:
Position your base unit somewhere hidden. Mine is actually sitting right on top of our audio visual receiver.

Step 5:
Position your IR blasters over the IR sensors on your equipment.

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You can figure out where your IR sensors are by shining a flashlight on to the front of your components at a 45 degree angle. You'll see a circle under the translucent plastic (usually about the size of a nickel). Peel off the sticky back of the blaster and stick it on.

The kit I purchased came with two double blaster cables. We only have two IR controlled components in our cabinet so I only needed to use one cable.

The IR repeater will now take any signal it gets and blast it out to all the components and you can leave your cabinet doors closed!

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Two unforeseen advantages came along with installing the IR repeater too! One, the dog is no longer tall enough to get in the way of the remote signals and two, there's a little blue LED on the IR receiver so you know 100% when  you're sending a signal.

I'm 100% so happy happy happy that this little guy came in to our entertainment world. No more unsightly audio visual components hanging out in open doors. No more dog smashing in to them while playing and no more getting up (after forgetting they're closed) to open the door when you've finally sat down after a long day at work! That last bit happened WAY too often.

1 Response

  1. This little device has been crucial to us in our bedroom television. All of our components are tucked out of the way and the only thing you see is the TV and the IR receiver. One thing to note, some televisions are notoriously bad for sending out IR on their own or causing significant interruption in signal. When this happens there are more expensive and heavier duty IR repeaters that work to block those extra flashes. We had that issue and it took a little while to figure out just what was happening.

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