Makin Frames

You may remember on my kitchen wish list a few months ago, I was crushing hard on the butcher series of prints from a local shop Smash Gallery.

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Smash Gallery Butchery Print

They make awesome prints, but I especially loved the butcher series, and have been dying to put them in our house somewhere. As the kitchen reno was drawing to a close I knew this was my perfect chance to grab a couple prints.

I purchased the Pork print and the Knives print. It was hard to decide between all of them, and truth be told I may have to go back and get the beef one as well.

So with both my new Pork & Knife print in hand, I set out to create some fun & inexpensive frames. I could go with a standard Ikea frame, but I wanted something larger for the kitchen. When most of my options came up too expensive, I decided to make a quick & easy frame for myself.

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Framed Knife Print

DIY Large Frame (amount/cuts are for one frame, double for two)

Supplies:

  • 1 – 1×6 pine board @ 8′
  • 1 – 1×6 pine board @ 6′
  • 1 – 2×4′ handy panel of 1/8″ mdf or hardboard
  • Kreg Jig
  • 1 1/3″ pocket hole screws
  • Wood Glue
  • Finishing supplies (sanding supplies & paint or stain & poly)
  • Staple Gun & Staples
  • Double Sided Tape
  • Miter Saw (If you dont have a miter saw you can use a hand saw and miter box, or just do straight cuts and have the hardware store cut your wood for you)
Print, staple gun, tape measure & double sided tape

Print, staple gun, tape measure & double sided tape

How To:

  • Measure your artwork (ours was 22″ x 30″) & decide on frame size (we opted to make the inside of our frame 21″ x 29″)
  • Get hardware store to cut your mdf to size (ours was cut to the same size as the print, 22×30″)
  • Using a miter saw cut your frame pieces to length. To ensure your frame will be nice and square, cut both side pieces together. We clamped ours together with a few wood clamps. Cut one end to a 45degree, then flip your wood, measure & mark, and make your second cut. (in our case it was 29″ for the sides, and 21″ for the top & bottom)  Repeat for the other pieces of your frame.
Cutting frame pieces to size. Cut both sides at the same time to make sure they're exactly the same size

Cutting frame pieces to size. Cut both sides at the same time to make sure they’re exactly the same size

  • Lightly sand off any of your imperfections on the edges, and drill two Kreg pocket holes in the angle of each of your side pieces.
Drill Pocket Holes

Drill Pocket Holes

  • Assemble your frame with Kreg screws.
Assemble frame with pocket hole screws. Clamp wood together to keep it from moving

Assemble frame with pocket hole screws. Clamp wood together to keep it from moving

  • Fill any holes or gaps with wood filler, and sand your entire piece.
Sand any imperfections. Hand sanding works best for the inside edges, and you can use a power sander on the frame face

Sand any imperfections. Hand sanding works best for the inside edges, and you can use a power sander on the frame face

Sanded Frame

Sanded & filled Frame (you can see wood filer in a ding in the wood, as well as a bit in the corner joint.)

  • Finish with paint or stain.
I painted with Benjamin Moore's Paper Mache to match my Ikea Adel Cabinets

I painted with Benjamin Moore’s Paper Mache to match my Ikea Adel Cabinets

Paint

Paint

  • Attach print to backer board with double sided tape.
Its hard to see, but there is a shiney bit where the double sided tape is applied to the board.

Its hard to see, but there is a shiney bit where the double sided tape is applied to the board.

  • Staple backer board to back of the frame making sure your image is centered.
Attach print & backer to frame with staples

Attach print & backer to frame with staples

  • Attach method of hanging. I like those little jagged hangie thingies (yes that’s the technical term.)
Jagged little hangie thingies

Jagged little hangie thingies

Hang & pat yourself on the back, cause your framing project looks super awesome.

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Completed Frames

SOURCE LIST:

Materials & Tools: (See Above)

Difficulty Level (on a scale of 1-5):

one out of five

Total Cost: $55 ($40 for the print, and $15 for the frame)

1 Response

  1. I always buy my frames and I'm never totally satisfied with the ones I can afford. I've thought about buying frame stock and making my own but I haven't made the commitment yet. You guys made it look easy. You've shamed me. :-)

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